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New Eco Friendly De-Inking Process Developed.

A new technology utilising enzymes (biological molecules) has been shown to remove ink from recycled paper. A research project conducted by the University of  Malaysia Sarawak reported the use of a crude enzyme preparation for the enzymatic de-inking of mixed office paper. Traditional de-inking methods have involved the use of large quantities of chemicals, causing pollution to the environment.  The enzyme material was prepared by growing endoglucanase (enzyme use for the enzymatic treatment) producing Bacillus licheniformis BL-P7 in a liquid culture media containing sago pith waste and rice husk. Furthermore, the process proved to be more effective for the removal of larger ink particles. Also, properties such as brightness, air permeability, tensile, and tear were enhanced in the preparation of the recycled mixed office paper.

Researchers : Hashimatul F.H., Hairul A.R., Andrew Wong H.H., Awg A.Sallehin A.H. (all of Universiti Malaysia Sarawak), Nigel Lim P.T. (Sarawak Forestry Corporation) Adapted from materials provided by Universiti Malaysia Sarawak

Organic Wine Leaves Only Half the Eco Footprint of Non-Organic!

Italian environmental scientists from the University of Siena, measured the resources needed to produce wine at two farms in Tuscany. Both were utilizing Sangiovese grapes but one was totally organic and the other was not. The organic farm used natural fertilisers and most of the work was done by hand, while the other farm used conventional methods of production. A bottle from the organic farm had an eco-footprint of 7.17 square metres, half that of the non-organic wine with a footprint of 13.98 square metres. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, DOI: 10.1016/j

Low Sperm Count Link to Soy also includes Nuts, Wines and Beers

The high levels of oestrogen like chemicals in soya beans have also been found in beers, wines and nuts. Gunter Kuhnle of the MRC Dunn Human Nutrition Unit in Cambridge, UK tested foods and beverages using mass spectrometry. Previous testing had focused on lignans but ignored isoflavones and this expanded search has found phytoestrogens in many more foods and drinks. Studies into the effects of phytoestrogens have produced a mixture of results, with some showing compounds that protect against cancer, menopausal symptoms and heart diseases, whilst others have been linked to increased risk of breast cancer and male infertility.  Journal reference:                                                                                                    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (DOI: 10.1021/jf801534g)

A-Beta Protein Alzheimer Disease Clues

Amyloid-beta the thinking brain’s protein has been shown to be intrinsically involved in increased neuron activity. A study into people with severe brain injuries resulted in steadily rising levels of A-beta protein as their brain activity increased through recovery. A-beta, as the protein is sometimes called, is best known for causing plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. It is a normal component of the brain, but scientists don’t know what it does. Traumatic brain injuries increase the risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers from Milan, Italy and Washington University in St. Louis, USA used advance brain testing techniques to ascertain if brain injuries cause a spike in amyloid-beta levels that could lead to plaque formation, a team of researchers from Milan, Italy, sampled fluid from the brains of 18 comatose patients.

What the researchers found was exactly the opposite of what they expected, says David L. Brody, a neurologist at Washington University who led the study with Sandra Magnoni of the Ospedale Maggiore in Milan. Instead of seeing a spike of A-beta soon after brain injury from falls, car accidents, assaults or hemorrhages, levels of the protein started low and rose as the patients improved, the team reports in the Aug. 29 Science.

Farm Kids Avoid Asthma & Allergies

Pre-natal exposure to farm animals and plants helps protect children from asthma, allergies and eczema. Researchers from the Centre for Public Health Research discovered farmers’ children had a lower incidence of allergic diseases than children not exposed to animals, grain and hay products. The findings have been published in the European Respiratory Journal. Associate Professor Jeroen Douwes says it is the first study to show a direct link between exposures in utero and a significant reduction in asthma symptoms, hay fever and eczema.

©Eco Living Magazine.

Eco Living Magazine

Midas Word

Organic Wines in Australia

Eco Living Magazine presents:

Heading: Organic Sommelier

Wines by region in Australia & New Zealand

With The Sacred Chef

Intro: For the freshest fruit flavours available in your wine drinking experience, it is hard to go past good organic wine. When the fruit on the vine has been treated with knowledgeable care – sans the chemicals – it often takes the wine making to a whole new level.

By the same token, being organic does not turn ordinary wine into great wine and cannot replace wine making proficiency. The number of organically grown wines is increasing all the time, and I counted well over fifty wineries making organic wines during a brief bit of research. However, distribution difficulties for many wineries mean that you do not find much of a range in your local bottle shop, and this is something that can be greatly improved upon.

I am a strong advocate of regionalism or the eponymous terroir – meaning that certain regions, climates and soil types produce better examples of certain varieties of wine. It took me a while to realise this, and since I have pretty much committed myself to following this course of action I have had far fewer disappointing wine experiences. Of course there are always wonderful exceptions to any set of rules and some tragic ones too… We all have different likes and dislikes, as well in our wine tastes, and whatever I recommend here are really only my own opinions and I encourage you to follow your own taste buds.

White wines

Sauvignon Blanc – Upfront fresh tangy fruit driven style – New Zealand’s Marlborough, SA’s Adelaide Hills, WA’s Margaret River/Pemberton, NSW’s Orange, TAS’s North and South.

Semillon – A clean crisp lemony style when young but ages into a complex burnished beauty- NSW’s Hunter Valley.

Semillon/Sauvignon Blanc – A blend of these two varieties best exemplified by – WA’s Margaret River, Great Southern.

Riesling – Dry apple, lime, mineral and sometimes floral style – SA’s Eden Valley, Clare Valley, WA’s Frankland; TAS’s North and South.

Chardonnay – Versatile style of wine ranging from full flavoured, creamy, buttery, big to peach, melon and lemon – VIC’s Yarra Valley, Mornington Peninsula, Beechworth; SA’s Adelaide Hills, WA’s Margaret River; TAS’s North and South.

Viognier – Full blown peach/apricot fruit and honey style – VIC’s Yarra Valley, SA’s Barossa Valley

Red wines

Pinot Noir –  Wild strawberry and cherry aromas and a flavour spectrum from young and fruity to elegant and complex – VIC’s Yarra Valley, Mornington Peninsula, Geelong; SA’s Adelaide Hills; TAS’s North and South;  NZ’s Marlborough, Central Otago

Cabernet Sauvignon – Deep inky colour and black current flavour, classic wine that blends exceptionally well with merlot, high anti-oxidant rating – WA’s Margaret River; SA’s Coonawarra, Padthaway, Wrattonbully, McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, Riverland; VIC’s Pyranees, Goulburn Valley, Bendigo, Yarra Valley;  NSW’s Orange, Mudgee, Cowra, Hunter Valley.

Merlot – Soft, dry and dark fruit variety of wine that has too few great examples in Australia except when partnering cabernet sauvignon – SA’s Coonawarra, McLaren Vale, Barossa Valley, Clare Valley

Shiraz – Blackberry and vanilla aromas in this red variety which ranges from chocolatey, prunish, high alcohol in warm regions to peppery and herbal in cooler areas – SA’s Clare Valley, Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Adelaide Hills, WA’s Margaret River, VIC’s Yarra Valley, Heathcote, Mornington Peninsula, Grampians; NSW’s Hunter Valley, Canberra District

Grenache – Great blending variety with shiraz, earthy fruity flavours – SA’s Barossa Valley

Sangiovese – Italian varietal full of red fruit flavours with a herbal savoury finish – SA’s McLaren Vale

Tempranillo – Savoury black cherry Spanish variety blends well with shiraz – SA’s McLaren Vale

Zinfandel – Spicy and black berry big flavoured, alcoholic variety with massive plantings in California – WA’s Margaret River; SA’s McLaren Vale.

REVIEWS

Temple Bruer 2007 Cabernet Merlot Preservative Free.

This is an incredible wine with cabernet berry fruit flavours that seem to be dancing in your mouth and a lovely medium bodied balance that can keep you drinking it all night long. This is my wine of the year so far and I recommend it highly to lovers of wine who want a flexible companion to great tasting meals of many persuasions.

I am looking forward to trying the 2008 vintage of this wine – now out.

RRP $20.00

www.templebruer.com.au

Cullen Wines 2007 Margaret River White

As with all Cullen wines finesse is to the fore, and well before their decision to go biodynamic and organic they were making some of the finest wines in Australia. This predominantly Sauvignon Blanc and Semillion blend is a gorgeous wine, complex and refreshing. This will lift any extraordinary lunch or dinner to the sublime and you will thank existence for your taste buds.

RRP $25.00

www.cullenwines.com.au

Happs 2007  Preservative Free White

Another stunner from the west, this Chardonnay with amazing fruit flavours will reinvigorate the most jaded pallet. Drinking these wines you feel purer inside and it can be akin to a religious experience. The Happs vineyards are located in Dunsborough and Karridale WA.

RRP $22.00

www.happs.com.au

©Eco Living Magazine.

Eco Living Magazine

Midas Word