A2 Milk Different White Stuff

Eco Living Magazine presents:

Mad, bad and dangerous to eat the series

A2 Milk Different White Stuff

With The Sacred Chef

INTRO: A few years ago; ‘milk was milk’, it came in funny shaped glass bottles and was delivered by a milkman, (who was rumoured to be infamously linked with extramarital activities), and who would run along behind the truck carrying the clinking milk bottles in their crates.

Then, along came the momentous choice between full fat milk and low fat milk; and glass milk bottles went the way of the dodo. Nowadays, producers are adding so much stuff into milk that it is hard to keep up – omega 3 fatty acids, added calcium, vitamin D, in addition to coffee, chocolate, banana and other flavours. ‘Low fat’ has been joined by ‘no fat’ and milk comes in a variety of cartons and plastic bottles. So, today a trip around the supermarket and up the dairy aisle entails a whole lot more choosing time than it once did.

If you really think about the simplicity of where it all came from – over there is the cow and here is a bucket and you pull on these…. Well now there is a whole new kind of cow’s milk to think about called A2, and this is an essentially different type of milk than everyone else’s. Humour aside, this is probably the most important development in the understanding of one of our most cherished consumer foods. We drink a lot of cow’s milk and we give our kids a lot of cow’s milk products, and if there is a concern about it; we should all be informed.

There are two main forms of the important cow’s milk protein, beta casein, found in the cows’ milk that you drink. These two forms are known as A1 and A2 beta casein. The A2 form of beta casein has been identified by scientific research to be the original form of beta casein that would have been produced by cows thousands of years ago. Every litre of milk contains about two teaspoons of beta-casein, usually a mix between A1 and A2.  A2 is the original type but over time a natural mutation occurred in some European cattle, and A1 beta-casein developed, says Keith Woodford, professor of farm management and agribusiness at Lincoln University in New Zealand, and the author of a book on the subject:  Devil in the Milk.

According to Woodford, the genetic difference between the two beta-caseins is tiny, but the difference in outcome is enormous. “The beta-casein has 209 amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and the difference between A1 and A2 is just one of these,” he says.

A1 milk beta-casein has been linked to allergies, type 1 diabetes, heart conditions and more recently some psychological conditions, such as Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism and Schizophrenia. For more info on these issues or to see details of the Devil in the Milk by Keith Woodford visit www.unireps.com.au

A2 milk is not genetically modified. It’s not that the A1 protein is taken out later: it’s that it was never there! The milk used in A2 branded milk is taken only from cows that produce the A2 form of beta casein.

Make Your Own A2 Yoghurt


Sterilize all bowls, utensils or yogurt maker (internal container) before starting. You can sterilize them in the dishwasher or boil them for 5-10 minutes.

What do you need:

*           2 litres of A2 Full Fat Milk

*           1 teaspoon dairy-free acidophilus

*           thermometer

Method:

1.     Bring milk to just under boiling point, and then pour the milk into a glass or earthenware dish. Let the milk cool to about 42°C.

2.     Prepare starter by combining acidophilus powder with 3 tablespoons A2 Milk (at room temperature).

3.     Pour the starter mixture into the milk carefully without disturbing the skin that may have formed on the surface of the milk.

4.     Cover with a cloth, place in a warm, draft-free place for 8 to 12 hours or overnight, and do not disturb it until the yoghurt thickens.

5.     Drain any excess liquid and store in the fridge for 4 to 5 days.

To make your yoghurt a thicker consistency

1.     Remove the skin on the surface of the yoghurt you’ve just made.

2.     Pour the yoghurt into a muslin bag.

3.     Hang the bag over a bowl and let drain for about 2 hours or until the desired thickness is obtained.

Serve with fresh berries or passionfruit; stir a little maple syrup through for an added treat.

©Eco Living Magazine.

Eco Living Magazine

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About sudhahamilton

Sudha Hamilton is the publisher of Eco Living Magazine http://www.ecolivingmagazine.com.au He loves writing and reading about the things that matter. Working predominantly as natural health writer, he has been published in WellBeing, Conscious Living, and Eco Living Magazines. Having spent many years on a spiritual path, originally in the company of Osho, he has an abiding interest in the human condition. From the micro to the macro he seeks to understand the truth that lies beneath the artifice and constructs, which daily delude us all.

Posted on January 24, 2009, in Health, Nutrition, Recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Chelsea Green is publishing Devil in the Milk, Keith Woodford’s book about A1 and A2 milk, for the North American market and it will be available in March. Go to: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/item/devil_in_the_milk:paperback

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